UCR

Evolution, Ecology & Organismal Biology



EEOB Faculty


Name
Title
Contact
Description

Helen Regan, Ph.D.  

Department Chair & Professor 

phone: 951-827-3961
fax: 951-827-4286
helen.regan@ucr.edu   

Chair's phone: 951-827-5901

My research areas span quantitative conservation ecology and probabilistic risk assessment. I use population models, mathematical treatments of uncertainty and decision-making techniques to address conservation and wildlife management issues and ecological risk assessment. Particular areas of interest include treatments of uncertainty in conservation, ecology and risk assessment, population viability analysis of endangered and threatened species, and formal decision making for conservation management. 
Kurt E. Anderson, Ph.D. Associate Professor phone: 951-827-2499
fax: 951-827-4286
kurt.anderson@ucr.edu
My research interests span quantitative population, community, and applied ecology with an emphasis on modeling spatial dynamics. My research activities are broad and include examining responses to spatial variation in streams and rivers, modeling spatially explicit consumer-resource interactions in terrestrial and aquatic systems, and data-driven modeling for conservation.
Alan Brelsford, Ph.D. Assistant Professor phone: 951-827-5632
Fax: 951-827-4286
alan.brelsford@ucr.edu
Population genomics of non-model organisms including amphibians, birds, and insects. Current projects include genetics of speciation, behavior, and sex determination.
Richard Cardullo, Ph.D. Professor phone: 951-827-6457
fax: 951-827-4286
richard.cardullo@ucr.edu

Biophysics and physiology of fertilization, focusing on molecular interactions between sperm and egg:

  • characterization of egg-associated proteins with complementary receptors on the sperm surface
  • dynamics of the sperm plasma membrane during fertilization
  • initiation and characterization of signal transduction pathways leading to the exocytosis of the acrosomal vesicle from sperm
Mark Chappell, Ph.D.  Professor phone: 951-827-7709
fax: 951-827-4286
mark.chappell@ucr.edu 
Evolutionary and ecological physiology using a variety of organisms ranging from insects to birds and mammals. Major research topics include adaptation to temperature and high altitude, limits to energy metabolism, energy costs of activity in ecologically-relevant contexts, and biotic and abiotic factors affecting avian altitude limits in the Andes.
Christopher J. Clark, Ph.D.  Assistant Professor phone: 951-827-3646
fax: 951-827-4286
cclark@ucr.edu 
Courtship displays, the mechanics of how feathers and wings produce sound, and bird flight biomechanics. The relationship between courtship display performance, flight performance, and female preferences, particularly in hummingbirds. 
Theodore Garland, Jr., Ph.D. Distinguished Professor  phone: 951-827-3524
fax: 951-827-4286
tgarland@ucr.edu 

Evolutionary biology and physiology, with emphasis on the evolution of complex phenotypes. 
We employ a variety of approaches and work on many animal systems, but our main emphasis is on:

  • experimental evolution of running behavior and performance in mice
  • early-life and epigenetic effects on adult traits
  • genetic and genomic analyses of physical activity
  • development and application of phylogenetic comparative methods to a variety of evolutionary questions; development of free software
  • lizard and snake locomotor physiology and behavioral ecology
Kimberly Hammond, Ph.D.  Professor; Director of the Natural Reserve System phone: 951-827-4767
fax: 951-827-4286
kimberly.hammond@ucr.edu  
Animal physiological ecology and evolutionary physiology, especially the manner in which individuals or species use variation in anatomical and physiological capacities to meet diverse environmental demands.
Tim Higham, Ph.D.   Associate Professor  phone: 951-827-3652
Fax: 951-827-4286
thigham@ucr.edu  
How animals function mechanically and physiologically in their environments, with emphasis on the biomechanics, muscle physiology and functional morphology of locomotion and feeding in vertebrates. Since physiological mechanisms have been modified over major evolutionary transitions in vertebrate ecology, mechanical analyses are coupled with evolutionary and ecological perspectives. Several aspects of the research are relevant to biomedical physiology.
Morris Maduro, Ph.D.  Professor 

phone: 951-827-7196
fax: 951-827-4286
mmaduro@ucr.edu  

Developmental mechanisms of cell fate specification and robustness in the nematode C. elegans, particularly the regulatory gene network that specifies the endoderm and mesoderm. Current work involves studying the mechanisms that control developmental robustness, using the intestine as a model for organ development from a single precursor cell to the fully-differentiated organ. 
Dmitri Maslov, Ph.D. Professor  phone: 951-827-6485
fax: 951-827-4286
maslov@ucr.edu  
Mitochondrial gene expression in kinetoplastid protozoa, including molecular biology, evolution and parasitology. Kinetoplastids have a unique organization of kinetoplast-mitochondrial DNA and a highly unusual process of post-transcriptional RNA processing, termed RNA editing. The main research focus is on regulation of RNA editing and its interactions with the system of translation. Additional research topics include evolution of kinetoplast DNA and RNA editing, and biodiversity of trypanosomatids, using molecular phylogenetic tools. 
Leonard Nunney, Ph.D  Professor phone: 951-827-5011
fax: 951-827-4286
leonard.nunney@ucr.edu   

Population and evolutionary genetics, with an emphasis on the application of basic theory to practical problems. Projects include:

  • The population genetics of small conserved populations.
  • The population genetics of cancer, a project derived from my interest in the theory of selection at different levels of organization.
  • Detecting adaptation using genomic data. My current focus is on the molecular evolution of Xylella fastidiosa, a plant pathogen causing Pierce's disease.
  • The role of genetic trade-offs in life history evolution, using primarily Drosophila.
Nicole Rafferty, Ph.D.  Assistant Professor  phone: 951-827-3800
fax: 951-827-4286
nicole.rafferty@ucr.edu   
Community and population ecology, with a focus on plants and pollinators. Current research centers on understanding how climate change-induced shifts in phenology and spatial distribution affect species interactions.
Helen Regan, Ph.D.  Professor  phone: 951-827-3961
fax: 951-827-4286
helen.regan@ucr.edu   
My research areas span quantitative conservation ecology and probabilistic risk assessment. I use population models, mathematical treatments of uncertainty and decision-making techniques to address conservation and wildlife management issues and ecological risk assessment. Particular areas of interest include treatments of uncertainty in conservation, ecology and risk assessment, population viability analysis of endangered and threatened species, and formal decision making for conservation management. 
David Reznick, Ph.D.  Distinguished Professor  phone: 951-827-5820
fax: 951-827-4286
david.reznick@ucr.edu   
We explore the process of evolution by natural selection from an experimental perspective and by testing evolutionary theory in natural populations. Guppies from the Caribbean Island of Trinidad are the primary study system, with particular emphasis on the role of predation in the evolution of life history traits, the rate of evolution under natural selection, and the evolution of aging
Derek Roff, Ph.D. Distinguished Professor  phone: 951-827-2437
fax: 951-827-4286
derek.roff@ucr.edu   
Theoretical and empirical studies of population and quantitative genetics, life-history, and the importance of trade-offs in shaping life history evolution. Current research focuses on insects (especially the importance of trade-offs in determining the evolution of wing dimorphism in various species of crickets) as model systems. 
Joel Sachs, Ph.D.  Vice Chair & Associate Professor  phone: 951-827-6357
fax: 951-827-4286
joels@ucr.edu   
Current research is focused on investigating basic questions about microbial evolution and ecology. We focus on symbiotic bacteria of plants and animals. 
Wendy Saltzman, Ph.D.   Professor  phone: 951-827-6356
Fax: 951-827-4286
saltzman@ucr.edu   
Behavioral endocrinology, especially the bidirectional interactions between hormones and social behavior in mammals. Research emphases include regulation of fertility and endocrine function by the social environment, and interactions between stress and reproductive behaviors. 
Marko Spasojevic, Ph.D.   Assistant Professor  phone: 951-827-5941
fax: 951-827-4286
marko.spasojevic@ucr.edu   
Plant communty ecology, working at the interface of ecology, biogeography and conservation. Research goals are to understand the mechanisms that influence patterns of biodiversity, and to use that understanding to address environmental issues. 
Mark Springer, Ph.D. Professor  phone: 951-827-6458
fax: 951-827-4286
mark.springer@ucr.edu  

Molecular evolution and systematics, with an emphasis on mammalian evolutionary history, including:

  • Phylogenetic relationships among the orders of mammals
  • Mammalian molecular clocks
  • The biogeographic history of mammals in relation to plate tectonic events
  • Character transformations for key innovations in mammalian history
  • The evolution of mammalian mitochondrial ribosomal RNA molecules
  • Evolutionary dynamics of transposable elements in sea urchins

More Information

General Campus Information

University of California, Riverside
900 University Ave.
Riverside, CA 92521
Tel: (951) 827-1012

Career OpportunitiesUCR Libraries
Campus StatusDirections to UCR

Department Information

Evolution, Ecology and Organismal Biology (EEOB)
2710 Life Sciences Bldg.

Tel: (951) 827-5903
Fax: (951) 827-4286
E-mail: bnnadmin@ucr.edu

Graduate Program
1140 Batchelor Hall
Tel: (951) 827-5913
Fax: (951) 827-5517
E-mail: eeobgrad@ucr.edu

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